Colossal Cave Adventure

I’d been working on updating an old php3 version of the Colossal Cave. Time and availability for other tasks (see: scanning 1958 radio & TV home study course…) got in the way. So I took the lazy-man’s way out.

The excellent Arthur O’Dwyer has generously allowed for posting (for historical recording, study, amusement and proliferation about the internet) on this website,  his great translation of the original Crowther & Woods 350 point version of “Adventure”. The work is all his, and we all owe a debt to the Elders: Will Crowther and Don Woods.

I’m so lazy, I borrowed his whole page, so as to not damage the content. Visit Colossal Cave.

My first contact with “Adventure” was at Harris Corporation (Interactive Terminals Group), on Dallas Parkway. I walked into the computer lab (and showroom!) one day to see Kim Shrier busily porting the Fortran version to a Perkin-Elmer Interdata 7/16. (Kim may correct me, some day, if I have the machine wrong).

Sprayberry Academy of Radio – Home Study Course,1945 edition

Finished scanning the Sprayberry Academy of Radio, 1945 edition of the home study course, generously shared by Dave Holder. Some of these weren’t scannable and a few were missing.

I was able to discover the names of the missing booklets from items that were listed on eBay. Perhaps someone else has these and can scan them for me (or send them to me for scanning and return by U.S. Postal Mail). To match, I’m using 300dpi scanning, greyscale. I can crop or cleanup as needed and put into an Acrobat PDF file.

Repairing VTVM Pilot Light

Lurid Red of the new Pilot Lamp

Lurid Red of the New Pilot Lamp

I found a great solution to old tape used in the Heathkit VTVMs for the RED pilot lamp. The lamp is just a #47 bulb, shining through a hole in the top of the meter face. The tape isn’t mentioned in the instructions, so perhaps it was pre-installed in the back of the meter face.

 

 

A Cheap Fix

Also Useful for Repairing Antique Pilot Lamp Film

 

In any case, this tape sometimes falls off or is nearly falling off after 50 years. It also fades and loses it’s reddish glow. An excellent solution was found in the form of a red-neck repair from the auto parts aisle of Walmart: Tail Light Repair Tape, US$2.00.

Tape replaces old, crinkly, peeling tape from this spot.

 

 

 

Above: Below the roll of red, translucent tape, the old pilot lamp film and the new piece cut to replace it.

Left: Adhesive is sticky and the new piece goes over the hole in the meter through which the pilot lamp shines.

Cosmic Stink

Last night, I turned on the Hallicrafters S-120 to catch some C&W music on AM.

Zortch! Followed by (smolder). And a great and unholy stench was unleashed.

It seems I’d left the old selenium rectifier in-circuit. Big mistake. I’d discounted the many comments by “The Elders” on Antiqueradios.com regarding the failure mode of these old rectifiers. Never again. After using it for several months in the office, then occasionally at home, I can now say this: it may have been sitting in storage for 30 years, mean-time-to-failure (MTTF) is about a year.

And if you don’t know what burnt selenium rectifier smells like… you don’t want to.

Replaced the old selenium rectifier (which made a satisfactory ‘clunk’ in trash can) with a 1N4007 diode. Also replaced R21, a 33 ohm Fuse-Resistor which… had done it’s job by going not quite open, but to over 100k-ohms, with a 5 watt, 100 ohm resistor. This value put the DC input voltages at almost the exact levels indicated on the schematic.

Now I’m on a hard-target search for any remaining selenium rectifiers in any of my test gear or tube radios.

An Improved VTVM Battery Eliminator

One of the disheartening things about buying an older (…well, they’re ALL older, now…) VTVM is opening it up and finding either an old, leaky battery, or evidence of one. This usually damages or destroys the battery contacts and sometimes also the circuit board. The battery, usually a standard 1.5V C-cell, is necessary for measuring resistances with the ‘ohms’ scale.

A great improvement has been suggested over the past couple of years to replace the battery entirely, using a modern voltage regulator, drawing power from the filament circuit. A version of this has been available on several Heathkit lists and I’ve used it in my V-7A and IM-18. This replaces the battery and removes the risk of leakage.

More recently, Peter Bertini, Pop Comm Magazine (and others) have pointed out that the circuit used an inefficient half-wave rectifier, probably adding stress to the (already old) VTVM’s transformer.

If, in ‘ohms’ mode, the probes are touched together (0.0 ohms resistance), the entire 1.55 Volts is placed across a 9.1Ω resistor, resulting in the maximum current draw of (I=V/R), or 1.55/9.1 = 170ma. This doesn’t count diode loss and heat loss in the voltage regulator.

The following circuit attempts to repair the inefficiencies and addresses ripple filtering in the regulator, so as to provide an efficient and accurate VTVM Battery Eliminator.

An Improved VTVM Battery Eliminator

The input is from the 6.3VAC filament circuit. The output goes to the same locations as the original dry-cell battery. In the case of a Heathkit V-7A, this is 0.0 to VTVM ground, and the +1.55VDC to the ‘free end’ of the 9.1Ω resistor (see a schematic at http://www.heathkit.nu/heathkit_nu_V-7A.html). More detail and a (somewhat better) solution for Heathkit’s grounded filament supply available here.

My First Project

This is probably the first project I’d done and it was when I worked at Mostek. I used a piece of scrap perfboard, some TTL ICs and sockets, and a few Old Style LEDs – big, old, current-consuming, 1982, RED LEDs. And some wire-wrap wire – it was all I could find, so that’s what I worked with.

1982 TTL Dual Dice - Top View

1982 TTL Dual Dice - Top View

The circuit is from Don Lancaster’s “TTL Cookbook”. It has worked for years and years, and uses almost any 6 to 9 volt Wall Wart. Unfortunatly, about 10 years ago a wire or two came loose from underneath (a rats-nest of misused wire-wrap). I finally got around to fixing it and actually replacing a rare burned-out LED.

A Rats Nest of Wire-wrap Wire - not the best choice, but it's what I had.

A Rats Nest of Wire-wrap Wire

I have no idea why I chose Wire-Wrap wire, other than it was something we had laying around or scrapped. It’s some of my earliest, gloppiest examples of soldering that I have. Wish I had that old Radio Shack P-Box that I build back when I was about 12.

ATX Desktop Supply Adapter

Built one of the ubiquitous ‘Desktop Power Supply’ from a recycled, ATX-form, PC power Supply. Actually used it occasionally to power a 12V charger in the garage. Unfortunately, it fizzled an electrolytic capacitor and it’s really not worth reparing.

So, I rescued all my hardware and built a reusable adapter for ANY standard ATX power supply.

Parts List:
1 ATX Power extender – this is an extension to the wide plug that goes to the motherboard, usually about 9 inches or so (like this one: http://www.directron.com/atxextension.html).
All of the other hardware bits needed to alter an ATX supply for desktop use (binding posts, a switch, a 10 ohm / 15 watt resistor (I used a Dale, metal-cased).
And an enclosure – a wide, thin, Radio Shack enclosure I had on hand.

The 10 ohm 15 watt resistor goes from the +5V rail to Ground. This is needed so that the supply can sense a load – otherwise, it will not start.

Excellent how-to’s everywhere on the net, but this one is great: http://web2.murraystate.edu/andy.batts/ps/powersupply.htm

Great current ratings here: http://web2.murraystate.edu/andy.batts/ps/PowerRatings.htm. The +5 and +12 rails can supply a good deal of power and these ATX switcher supplies are very efficient.

This adapter will provide desktop power supply access for a recycled ATX Supply.

ATX Power Supply Adapter